UK citizens favour second EU referendum by 16-point margin

news
27 January 2018

More UK citizens support a second referendum on EU membership than oppose another vote, according to a poll.

A total of 47 per cent of respondents are in favour of having a final say on Brexit once the terms of withdrawal are known, while 34 per cent are against reopening the question, according to the ICM poll for The Guardian.

According to commentators, excluding the 19 per cent who do not hold a view, it gives a 16-point lead in favour of a second referendum.

The poll comes after former Ukip leader Nigel Farage suggested he ''may be'' coming around to the idea of having a second referendum on EU membership to settle the issue.

According to European Council president Donald Tusk, Brussels continued to be open to the UK staying in the union.

Overall, according to the survey 51 per cent were now in favour of continuing in the EU while 49 per cent would vote to confirm June 2016's Leave vote.

Meanwhile, according to commentators, the uncertainty over Brexit apart, the poll showed that attitudes to Europe in parts of the UK are hardening with the country becoming more polarized.

The support for a second poll comes from both sides of the Brexit debate, with a quarter of leave voters in favour of another poll.

According to commentators, the poll makes clear that Brexit remains a hot issue in the UK, with the country still divided and opinions becoming increasingly bitter and more polarised.

UK prime minister Theresa May has insisted that UK will honour the outcome of the Brexit vote despite the warnings of EU officials.

The poll also showed up Brexit generational and geographical divide, with younger voters especially much more supportive of the UK continuing to be a member of the EU and older voters more sure than ever that it is best to leave. 

Also voters in Scotland are more likely to be pro-EU, whereas support for leave continues to be strong Wales and the Midlands.





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