Outrage among Britons as Denmark bans Maramite sales news
26 May 2011

Cracking down on added vitamins and minerals, the Danish government has yanked the hot-selling fortified yeast extract off grocers' shelves.

Tightening enforcement of restrictions on food products fortified with added vitamins and minerals, the Danish government this week banned stores from selling Maramite, the fortified yeast extract much loved by Britons, and its Australian cousin Vegemite (made by a different company).

The country had earlier banned other popular products like Horlicks, Ovaltine, Rice Krispies, and Farley's Rusks (meant for teething babies) under the same law. Food giant Kellogg's too withdrew some of its products from Denmark after the 2004 legislation. But Maramite had so far escaped the authorities' notice.

The order banning Marmite came from the Danish Veterinary and Food Administration on Tuesday. It sparked immediate outrage among the large British community in Denmark, as well as in Britain itself. Even Danish shopkeepers are none too happy.

"What am I supposed to put on my toast now?" The Guardian reported British advertising executive Colin Smith, who has lived in the country for six years, as asking. "I still have a bit left in the cupboard, but it's not going to last long."

Aside from inconveniencing foreigners, the ban has meant a serious economic loss for storekeepers, many of whom said Marmite was among their most popular products.





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Outrage among Britons as Denmark bans Maramite sales