Aston Martin to repair vehicles sold in US

The UK sports car maker Aston Martin is recalling around 5,500 Aston Martin cars in the US due to problems with powertrains and battery cables, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) said.

''If the park pawl does not engage and the vehicle is stopped on a slope and exited without the parking brake being applied, the vehicle may unexpectedly roll, increasing the risk of a crash,'' the NHTSA said.

The recalls are set to start in early February to repair problems with powertrains, the main components that generate power, and battery cables.

According to the NHTSA website, 3,493 DB9, DBS, Rapide, Virag and Vanquish models produced between 2009 and 2016 will be repaired, after engineers found that the cars could be at increased risk of rolling away, due to problems that cause the "Park" position not to engage.

A further 1,953 DB9 and DBS vehicles manufactured between 2005 and 2009 are being recalled due to increased risk of fire in the event of damage to battery supply cables when the driver seat is in the full rearward location.

The recalls come as the Gaydon, England-based company prepares for a stock market listing or a sale of the firm.

The vehicles, which carry a price tag of $200,000 (€168,460) plus, were made famous by the James Bond movies. The UK spy agent is often seen in films speeding in an Aston Martin, including the most recent film Spectre.

The US is Aston Martin's biggest market, comprising 20 per cent of its sales.

Commentators point out that though the recall is tiny compared to many large manufacturers, it represents around 18 months of worldwide sales of the high-end cars.

Bloomberg reports that some 3,600 Aston Martin models were sold globally last year, with the US accounting for 20 per cent of sales.